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Gaillard   Listen
adjective
Gaillard  adj.  Gay; brisk; merry; galliard.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Gaillard" Quotes from Famous Books



... pourvu qu'il eut un pari, Smiley etait satisfait. Et il avait une chance! une chance inouie: presque toujours il gagnait. It faut dire qu'il etait toujours pret a'exposer, qu'on ne pouvait mentionner la moindre chose sans que ce gaillard offrit de parier la-dessus n'importe quoi et de prendre le cote que l'on voudrait, comme je vous le disais tout a l'heure. S'il y avait des courses, vous le trouviez riche ou ruine a la fin; s'il y avait un combat de chiens, il apportait son ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... commanded by the king himself; a second by the duke of Brittany; a third by the duke of Alencon; and a fourth by the count of Dunois. The places opened their gates almost as soon as the French appeared before them; Verneuil, Nogent, Chateau Gaillard, Ponteau de Mer, Gisors, Mante, Vernon, Argentan Lisieux, Fecamp, Coutances, Belesme, Pont de l'Arche, fell in an instant into the hands of the enemy. The duke of Somerset, so far from having an army which could take the field and relieve these places, ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part B. - From Henry III. to Richard III. • David Hume

... rocks have been fancifully named after the celebrated structures they resemble. We find the Chateau Gaillard, the Sphinx, the Gate of Mycenae, or of the Lions, the Street of Tombs supposed to resemble Pompeii, some of colossal dimensions. Thus the citadel measures a hundred and fifty feet from the ground, at this point Montpellier-le-Vieux ...
— The Roof of France • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... Blunt vainly tried to comfort the sloe-eyed Angelique, who mourned for the unreturning visitor who had sprung over the easily-stormed battlements of her mobile heart. "Il etait bien beau, cet homme la! Il m'aimait beaucoup! Je le regretterai toujours! C'etait un vrai gaillard!" ...
— A Fascinating Traitor • Richard Henry Savage

... Chateau Gaillard (vignette.)—Black figures and boats, points of shade; sun-touches on castle, and wake of boat, of light. See how the eye rests on both, and observe how sharp and separate all the lights are, falling in spots, edged by shadow, but not ...
— Modern Painters Volume I (of V) • John Ruskin

... Simion Petrovitch," the governor remarked with a smile. "You remember Talleyrand! If it is really as you say the fellow won't escape us. You had better think of your—" the governor put his hand to his throat significantly. "By the way," he said, turning to Sipiagin, "et ce gaillard-la" (he moved his chin in Paklin's direction). "Qu'enferons nous? He does ...
— Virgin Soil • Ivan S. Turgenev

... Such magnanimity, however, was very rare. All respect for authority human or divine, all sense of shame or pity, all fear of hell and hope of heaven, seemed to have been obliterated from the breasts of the murderers. The blasphemous words of the furious Captain Gaillard, when opposed in his plan to destroy Botzheim and his fellow Germans, truly expressed the sentiments which others might possibly have hesitated to utter so distinctly. "Par la mort Dieu! il faut qu'il soit.... Il n'y a ny Dieu, ny diable, ny juge qui me puisse commander. Vostre vie est ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... young man, you are ver welcome, take one coup of bierre—and come to mine house to-morrow morning; Monsieur Concordance vil show you de way." Upon this I made my bow, and as I went out of the room could hear him say, "Ma foi! c'est un beau garcon; c'est un gaillard." ...
— The Adventures of Roderick Random • Tobias Smollett

... his legges caste to and fro; And playen songes or a small ribible;[15] Thereto he sung sometimes a loud quinible.[16] And as well could he play on a gitern.[17] In all the town was brewhouse nor tavern That he not visited with his solas,[18] There as that any gaillard tapstere[19] was. This Absolon, that jolly was and gay Went with a censor on the holy day, Censing the wives of the parish fast: And many a lovely look ...
— The Parish Clerk (1907) • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... terrible storming youth, afterwards renowned as Leon Michel Gambetta, had startled the quiet guests with his noisy eloquence, till the old habitues spilled their coffee, and the red-capped students said to each other, "Il ira loin, ce gaillard-la!" ...
— Our Hundred Days in Europe • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... other gentlemen: it was just in the very middle of the bone. M. le Prince took and showed it to the King and to the Queen, who all said that my prognosis had come true. The body was laid to rest at Chateau Gaillard: and I returned to Paris, where I found many patients, who had been wounded on the breach at Rouen, and chiefly Italians, who were very eager I should dress them: which I did willingly. Many of them recovered: the rest died. Mon petit maistre, I think you were called to dress some, for the great ...
— The Harvard Classics Volume 38 - Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology) • Various

... child-heiress; this provoked the French barons; in the war that ensued Arthur was captured, and subsequently murdered either by John himself or by his orders; Philip invaded Normandy, and with the fall of the Chateau-Gaillard in 1204, most of the French possessions were lost to the English crown; then followed John's quarrel with Pope Innocent III. over the election of an archbishop of Canterbury; the Pope consecrated Stephen Langton; John refused to receive him; ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... — N. humorist, wag, wit, reparteeist[obs3], epigrammatist, punster; bel esprit, life of the party; wit-snapper, wit- cracker, wit-worm; joker, jester, Joe Miller|!, drole de corps[obs3], gaillard[obs3], spark; bon diable[Fr]; practical joker. buffoon, farceur[French], merry-andrew, mime, tumbler, acrobat, mountebank, charlatan, posturemaster[obs3], harlequin, punch, pulcinella[obs3], scaramouch[obs3], ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... nays in the Senate were Messrs. James Barbour and James Pleasants, of Virginia; Nathaniel Macon, of North Carolina; John Gaillard and William Smith, of South Carolina. In the House, Philip P. Barbour, John Randolph, John Tyler, and William S. Archer, of Virginia; Charles Pinckney, of South Carolina (one of the authors of the Constitution); Thomas W. Cobb, of Georgia; and others ...
— The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government • Jefferson Davis

... known as the petite and grosse rousette—the same which yields the white Hermitage—that the champagne of the south is produced, and the vineyards where they are cultivated occupy all the more favourable slopes immediately outside the village, the most noted being the Coteau-Gaillard, Solignaes, ...
— Facts About Champagne and Other Sparkling Wines • Henry Vizetelly

... Carving A Runic Stone A Viking Ship Norse Metal Work (Museum, Copenhagen) Alfred the Great Alfred's Jewel (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) A Scene from the Bayeux Tapestry (Museum of Bayeux, Normandy) Trial by Combat Mounted Knight Pierrefonds Chateau Gaillard (Restored) King and Jester Falconry Farm Work in the Fourteenth Century Pilgrims to Canterbury A Bishop ordaining a Priest St. Francis blessing the Birds The Spiritual and the Temporal Power Henry IV, Countess Matilda, and Gregory VII Contest between ...
— EARLY EUROPEAN HISTORY • HUTTON WEBSTER

... a machine, he is a machinist. Gaillard is a friend of ours who has ended a miscellaneous career by becoming the editor of a newspaper, and whose character and finances are governed by movements comparable to those of the tides. Gaillard can contribute to make you ...
— Unconscious Comedians • Honore de Balzac

... our readers would hardly relish "The Cid." Let us go at once to that tragedy of Corneille's which, by the general consent of French critics, is the best work of its author, the "Polyeuctes." The following is the rhetorical climax of praise in which Gaillard, one of the most enlightened of Corneille's eulogists, arranges the different masterpieces of his author: "'The Cid' raised Corneille above his rivals; the 'Horace' and the 'Cinna' above his models; the 'Polyeuctes' above himself." This ...
— Classic French Course in English • William Cleaver Wilkinson

... Francis, second lieutenant, U.S. Army. Henry O. Franklin, second lieutenant, San Francisco, Cal. Ernest C. Frazier, second lieutenant, Washington, D.C. Arthur Freeman, first lieutenant, U.S. Army. Sewell G. Freeman, second lieutenant, Aragon, Ga. Edward S. Gaillard, first lieutenant, Indianapolis, Ind. Tacitus E. Gaillard, second lieutenant, Kansas City, Mo. James H.L. Gaines, second lieutenant, Little Rock, Ark. Ellsworth Gamblee, first lieutenant, Cincinnati, O. Lucian P. Garrett, ...
— History of the American Negro in the Great World War • W. Allison Sweeney

... quoque Romano more formatis. Eginhard (c. xxiii. p. 109-113) describes, like Suetonius the simplicity of his dress, so popular in the nation, that when Charles the Bald returned to France in a foreign habit, the patriotic dogs barked at the apostate, (Gaillard, Vie de Charlemagne, tom. iv. ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 5 • Edward Gibbon



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