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Amour

noun
1.
A usually secretive or illicit sexual relationship.  Synonyms: affair, affaire, intimacy, involvement, liaison.



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"Amour" Quotes from Famous Books



... combien votre affection,—car vous les aimez, votre livre et votre lettre en temoignent assez,—pour mes compatriotes et mon pays me touche; et je suis fiere de pouvoir le dire que les heroines de nos grandes epopees sont dignes de tout honneur et de tout amour. Y a-ti-il d'heroine plus touchante, plus aimable que Sita? Je ne le crois pas. Quand j'entends ma mere chanter, le soir, les vieux chants de notre pays, je pleure presque toujours. La plainte de Sita, quand, bannie pour la seconde fois, elle erre dans la vaste foret, ...
— Ancient Ballads and Legends of Hindustan • Toru Dutt

... a en chinois: Profondement attachees aux cinq desirs—Elles les aiment comme le Yak aime sa queue. Par la concupiscence et l'amour, elles s'aveuglent elles-memes, ...
— Chips From A German Workshop - Volume I - Essays on the Science of Religion • Friedrich Max Mueller

... what cost to your amour propre. You should have remembered you were engaged. You forgot that, too, I suppose. And then you go and forget your quarrel. It's the most hopeless exhibition of levity I ...
— A Set of Six • Joseph Conrad

... rout do these women make about nothing at all! Were it not for what the learned Bishop, in his Letter from Italy, calls the entanglements of amour, and I the delicacies of intrigue, what is there, Belford, in all they ...
— Clarissa, Volume 4 (of 9) - History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... but the real affaire d'amour of my life must have no elements but magnificent ones. She must be some great lady of the court, and our passion must be attended by circumstances of mystery, danger, everything to complicate it and raise it to an epic height. Such was the amour I had determined to find in Paris. Remember, you who read this, that I am disclosing the inmost dreams of a man of twenty-one. Such dreams are appropriate to that age; it is only when they are associated with middle ...
— An Enemy To The King • Robert Neilson Stephens

... blunder, by afterward writing the words December and November at full length. Better still, because more comic, is the blunder of a Frenchman, who, puzzled by the title of one of Cibber's plays, "Love's Last Shift," translates it "La Derniere Chemise de l'Amour." We laugh at these mistakes, and forget them; but who can forget the blunder of the Cork almanack-maker, who informs the world that the principal republics in Europe, are Venice, ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. IV • Maria Edgeworth

... looked forward to their meetings. Yet constantly the law of the adventurer, which means the instinct of practical decency, warned him that this was no amour for him; that he must not make love where he did not love; that this good-hearted vulgarian was too kindly to tamper with and too absurd to love. Only——And again his breath would draw in with swift exultation as he recalled how elastic were her ...
— The Trail of the Hawk - A Comedy of the Seriousness of Life • Sinclair Lewis

... aimer, aimable, amiable, aimablement, aimant, amabilite, amical, amicalement, amitie, amour, amoureux, ...
— French Conversation and Composition • Harry Vincent Wann

... could live happily. This she scornfully refused, whereupon "one of the ruffians strangled her for ten marcs of silver; and her soul, white and pure as the angels, ascended to the throne of Jesus, in whom she so well believed, and there became 'l'unique espoux dont elle ambitionait l'Amour.'" ...
— Vanished towers and chimes of Flanders • George Wharton Edwards

... for truth's sake is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and the seed-plot of all other virtues.—LOCKE, Letter to Collins. Il n'est plus possible aujourd'hui a l'historien d'etre national dans le sons etroit du mot. Son patriotisme a lui c'est l'amour de la verite. Il n'est pas l'homme d'une race on d'un pays, il est l'homme de tous les pays, il parle au nom de la civilisation generale.—LANFREY, Hist. de Nap. iii. 2, 1870. Juger avec les parties de soi-meme qui sont le moins des formes du temperament, et le plus des facultes penetrees ...
— Lectures on Modern history • Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

... the founder of their school, hastened to produce operas, which, though bearing traces of Italian influence, were nevertheless distinctively French in manner and method. His works, two of which are known to us, 'Pomone' and 'Les Peines et les Plaisirs de l'Amour,' were to a certain extent a development of the masques which had been popular in Paris for many years. They are pastoral and allegorical in subject, and are often merely a vehicle for fulsome adulation of the 'Roi ...
— The Opera - A Sketch of the Development of Opera. With full Descriptions - of all Works in the Modern Repertory • R.A. Streatfeild

... outrage upon manners, and the fortune of the volume was secured. The early poems of De Maupassant like those of Paul Bourget, are not without sterling merit as poetry, but their main interest is that they reflect the characteristics of their author's mind. Such pieces as "Fin-d'Amour," and "Au Bord de l'Eau," in the 1880 volume, are simply short stories told in verse, instead of in prose. In this same year, Guy de Maupassant, who had thrown in his lot with the Naturalist Novelists, contributed a short tale to the volume called Les Soirees ...
— The works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 5 (of 8) - Une Vie and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant 1850-1893

... les autres d'un amour fraternal et, pour prevaloir contre l'ennemi, mettez en commun vos biens et vos penses. Que parmi vous les plus grands et les plus forts soient les serviteurs des faibles. Ne marchandez pas plus vos richesses que votre ...
— Defenders of Democracy • Militia of Mercy

... "Roman de la Rose" to the "Ballade des Dames du Temps jadis" was a short step for the Middle-Age giant Time,—a poor two hundred years. Then Villon woke up to ask what had become of the Roses:—Ou est la tres sage Helois Pour qui fut chastie puis moyne, Pierre Esbaillart a Saint Denis? Pour son amour ot cest essoyne. ...
— Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres • Henry Adams

... it from its object. At length, after mentioning many particulars, suppressing, however, those which must have necessarily brought it home to Amelia, I concluded with begging her to be the confidante of my amour, and to give me her ...
— Amelia (Complete) • Henry Fielding

... the Pacific. Its isothermes (the lines of equal mean annual temperatures) strike on the north the coast of Norway midway, touch St. Petersburg in Russia, and pass through Manchooria on the coast of Asia, about three degrees south of the mouth of the Amour river. On the south, these isothermes run through Northern Africa, and nearly the centre of Egypt near Thebes, cross Northern Arabia, Persia, Northern Hindostan, and ...
— The Continental Monthly, Volume V. Issue I • Various

... l'amour de Dieu, un sou pour acheter un petit pain. J'ai si faim!" "Comment!" responded the cloyed sensualist, in search of an appetite, who was thus accosted; "tu as faim, petit drole! Tu es bien heureux!" The readers of ...
— Horace • Theodore Martin

... qu'il n'oseroit, et que ce seroit pour lui une affaire trop dangereuse, si elle etoit sue; mais comme il n'est rien qu'un Maure ne fasse pour de l'argent, je donnai a celui-ci un ducat, et, pour l'amour du ducat, il m'apprit tout ce qu'il savoit, et me donna meme des moules en bois et autres ingrediens que j'ai apportes ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... Dairy. H.H. Hobday. A ticklish village amour: a young fellow importuning a buxom dairy-maid, and apparently on the verge of conquest; in the distant door-way stands a mar-loving, wrinkled old woman, whose crabbed face ought not to be ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XIX. No. 540, Saturday, March 31, 1832 • Various

... my palm; and then, said he, I tell thee, by this score here, That thou, within few months, shalt be The youthful Prince D'Amour here. ...
— A Selection From The Lyrical Poems Of Robert Herrick • Robert Herrick

... this theme, let us quote two or three passages in which the theme itself is set forth in all its simplicity. "You are only bound to treat people according to form," says Doctor Diafoirus in the "Malade imaginaire". Again, says Doctor Bahis, in "L'Amour medecin": "It is better to die through following the rules than to recover through violating them." In the same play, Desfonandres had previously said: "We must always observe the formalities of professional etiquette, whatever may happen." And the reason is given by Tomes, ...
— Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic • Henri Bergson

... tres-haute idee de votre merite et de votre caractere. Vous apprendrez sans doute avec plaisir que vos enfants ont fait du progres tresremarquable dans toutes les branches de l'enseignenient, et que ces progres sont entierement du a leur amour pour le travail et a leur perseverance; nous n'avons eu que bien peu a faire avec de pareilles eleves; leur avancement est votre oeuvre bien plus que la notre; nous n'avons pas eu a leur apprendre le prix du temps et de l'instruction, ...
— The Life of Charlotte Bronte - Volume 1 • Elizabeth Gaskell

... thou meanest," said Achilles, "of that iron-handed Frank, who dashed to pieces last night the golden lion of Solomon with a blow of his fist? By St. George, the least which can come of such an amour is broken bones." ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... and seal, upon oath. promised &c v.; affianced, pledged, bound; committed, compromised; in for it. Adv. as one's head shall answer for. Phr. in for a penny in for a pound; ex voto [Lat.]; gage d'amour. ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... a row and a half if I liked, but for your sake I'm keeping it all dark. I hope you'll come down soon. It will be an awful game if you do, and I'll promise to keep the fellows from grinning. Maintenant, il faut que je close haut. Donnez mon amour a mere et pere, et esperant que vous etes tout droit, souvenez me votre aimant frere, Arthur Herapath. Dig envoie son amour ...
— The Master of the Shell • Talbot Baines Reed

... was married: but he had beside a secret amour with a marvellous beautiful woman, which came weekly to him every Monday, into a summer-house in the garden. This commerce remained long concealed from his wife. When he withdrew from her side, he pretended to her, that he went, by night, into the ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXLV. July, 1844. Vol. LVI. • Various

... l'amour Me va consumant unit et jour. Vive Jesus, vive sa force, Vive son agreable amore. Vive Jesus, quand il m'enivre D'un douceur qui me fait vivre. Vive Jesus, lorsque sa bouche D'un baiser amoureux me touche. Vive Jesus, grand il ...
— Flowers of Freethought - (Second Series) • George W. Foote

... find me a Sybil: Madam, I ever prophesy'd a happier end of that Amour than your ill Fortune has hitherto promised,—but ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. III • Aphra Behn

... 4: Alluding to the newspaper account of a certain Royal sailor's amour.—R. B. This was Prince William Henry, third son of George III, afterward ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... the two favourites. The one was daughter of Elie Enka, who was a musician in the chapel of the late king. Handsome and witty, she had at twelve years of age attracted the notice of the king, then prince royal, and he had, at that early age, as in anticipation of his amour, bestowed on her all the care and all the cost of a royal education. She had travelled in France and in England, and knew all the European languages; she had polished her natural genius by contact with the lettered men and artists of Germany. A feigned marriage with Rietz, valet de chambre of ...
— History of the Girondists, Volume I - Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution • Alphonse de Lamartine

... par les ans vengeurs de mon martyre Que l'or de vos cheveux argente deviendra, Que de vos deux soleils la splendeur s'esteindra, Et qu'il faudra qu'Amour tout confus s'en retire. La beaute qui si douce a present vous inspire, Cedant aux lois du Temps ses faveurs reprendra, L'hiver de vostre teint les fleurettes perdra, Et ne laissera rien des thresors que i'admire. Cest orgueil desdaigneux qui vous fait ...
— A Life of William Shakespeare - with portraits and facsimiles • Sidney Lee

... this country as tomato and generally as tomate in continental Europe, is also known as Wolf-peach and Love Apple in England and America, and Liebesapfel in Germany, Pomme d'Amour in France, Pomo d'oro in Italy, ...
— Tomato Culture: A Practical Treatise on the Tomato • William Warner Tracy

... Amour qui unyz nous faict uiure, En foy noz cueurs preparera, Qui long temps ne nous pourra suyure, Car ...
— The Dance of Death • Hans Holbein

... ill-treated and left destitute, she did not lose faith in human nature: she seemed a born optimist, believing most men good;—she would make a home for another and serve him better than any slave.... "Ne de l'amour," says a creole writer, "la fille-de- couleur vit d'amour, de ...
— Two Years in the French West Indies • Lafcadio Hearn

... bruit des preparatifs de guerre, mais j'espere qu'on restera aux preparatifs et apres le rapprochement qui a eu lieu entre vous, Sire, et la Prusse, j'ai toute confiance qu'il vous sera possible d'assurer une solution pacifique de cette question Suisse,[67] malheureusement envenimee par l'amour-propre froisse de ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861 • Queen of Great Britain Victoria

... Wimpffen sought refuge in politics. 'It is your interest, from a political standpoint, to grant us honorable conditions,' he said. 'France is generous and chivalric, responsive to generosity, and grateful for consideration. A peace, based on conditions which would flatter the amour-propre of the army, and diminish the bitterness of defeat, would be durable; whereas rigorous measures would awaken bad passions, and, perhaps, bring on an endless war between France and Prussia.' The new ground broken called up Bismarck, 'because the matter seemed to belong to my province,' ...
— Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4 • Wolfgang Menzel, Trans. Mrs. George Horrocks

... treatise. Venus and Helen, Liber and Lyaeus, are but the current coin of poetic diction common to the whole student class. These Olympian deities merge without a note of discord into the dim background of a medieval pothouse or the sylvan shades of some ephemeral amour, leaving the realism of natural appetite in either ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... the nature of angels, and other subjects which interested the Middle Ages. Such was his fame and dialectical skill that he was taken away from his teachings and sent to Rome to defend his Order and the cause of orthodoxy against the slanders of William of Saint Amour, an aristocratic doctor, who hated the Mendicant Friars and their wandering and begging habits. William had written a book called "Perils," in which he exposed the dangers to be apprehended from the ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume V • John Lord

... In R. Maak's "Journey to the Amour," it is recorded:—"It is not unusual for the Maniagri to suffer also from a nervous malady of the most peculiar kind, with which we had already been made acquainted by the descriptions of several travellers. [118] This malady is met with, for the most part, amongst ...
— The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes • Fedor Jagor; Tomas de Comyn; Chas. Wilkes; Rudolf Virchow.

... to suppress thirty monasteries, and use their revenues for educational purposes; and Wolsey's schemes of reform might have progressed further if Henry VIII. had not been fascinated by Anne Boleyn. But the King's amour with the "little lively brunette" precipitated a crisis in the relations between Church ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... accomplish certain things for his own government, it must be owned that he had considerable success. Although his means were small, he managed to engage in the French service an active American fleet including such vessels as Le Cassius, L'Ami de le Point a Petre, L'Amour de la Liberte, La Vengeance, La Montagne, Le Vainqueur de la Bastille, La Carmagnole, L'Esperance, Le Citoyen Genet, Sans Pareil, and Le Petit Democrate. The last-mentioned vessel was originally an English merchantman, the brig Little Sarah, brought into Philadelphia ...
— Washington and His Colleagues • Henry Jones Ford

... scornfully. "I am really anxious to know how this affair is going to end, and how my brave rioters will chastise the ambassador for his insolence. What, another rap already? Why, you are a genuine postillon d' amour! Do you bring me ...
— LOUISA OF PRUSSIA AND HER TIMES • Louise Muhlbach

... never himself, in the sense of the phrase as employed by lovers of the Parisian school, 'ivre d'amour,' may be admitted without prejudice to his sensibility,[164] and that he never knew 'l'amor che move 'l sol e l'altre stelle,' was the chief, though unrecognised, calamity of his deeply chequered life. But the reader of honour and feeling will not therefore suppose that the love which Miss ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... for all business." Cobenzl was nevertheless still able to keep up his jocular style in asking the ambassador for the English subsidies:—"Vous etes malade, je le suis aussi un peu, mais ce qui est encore plus malade que nous deux ce sont nos finances; ainsi pour l'amour de Dieu depechez vous de nous donner vos deux cent mille livres sterlings. Je vous embrasse de tout mon coeur,"—Cobenzl to Paget, enclosed ...
— History of Modern Europe 1792-1878 • C. A. Fyffe

... state some animals, when pressed by hunger in winter, swallow clay or friable steatites; such are the wolves in the northeast of Europe, the reindeer and, according to the testimony of M. Patrin, the kids in Siberia. The Russian hunters, on the banks of the Yenisei and the Amour, use a clayey matter which they call rock-butter, as a bait. The animals scent this clay from afar, and are fond of the smell; as the clays of bucaro, known in Portugal and Spain by the name of odoriferous earths (tierras olorosas), have an odour agreeable to women.* ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... Princess's amused me the other day. Somebody wanted to give Nelitchka garlic as a medicine. "Quoi? Une petite amour comme ca, qu'on ne pourrait pas baiser? Il n'y a pas de sens ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... of some new fit of obstinacy, which my amour propre might have sustained somewhat better than my purse, I wrote down my name, had the book put on one side, and went out. I must have given considerable food for reflection to the witnesses of this scene, who would no doubt ...
— Camille (La Dame aux Camilias) • Alexandre Dumas, fils

... aimlessness, and that, therefore, she is tempted to think too much about herself. She is also tempted to have longings for—well, for temptation. Ah, she is a woman and temptation is in the way of women. Qui parle d'amour, fait l'amour: temptation comes to the woman who thinks about being tempted. Now, I want to give her something to think about that shall lead her out of the thoughts of temptation which I suppose come naturally to a daughter of Eve—the first woman who thought ...
— Phyllis of Philistia • Frank Frankfort Moore

... typographical errors which he thought intentional—he got a certain satisfaction from believing that the citizens of Lincoln had meekly accepted the epithet "coarse barbarians." "You see how it is," he said to me, "where there is no chivalry, there is no amour propre." When I met him on his rounds now, I thought he carried his head more disdainfully than ever, and strode up the steps of front porches and rang doorbells with more assurance. He told Lena he would never forget how I had stood by him when ...
— My Antonia • Willa Sibert Cather

... parquetry almost hidden by Bokhara rugs, trying to forget the girl. Stopping before an elaborate ebony and gold lectern, he found a volume in vellum, opened and in it he read: "Livre des grandes Merveilles d'amour, escript en Latin et en francoys par Maistre Antoine Gaget 1530." "Has love its marvels?" pondered the disquieted young man. Turning over the title-page he came upon these words in sweet ...
— Melomaniacs • James Huneker

... The amour and the malice of Felipillo, which, Quintana seems to think, rest chiefly on Garcilasso's authority, (see Espanoles Celebres, tom. II. p. 210, nota,) are stated very explicitly by Zarate, Naharro, Gomara, Balboa, all contemporaneous, though not, ...
— The History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William H. Prescott

... Voix, mourez done, mourantes que vous etes Sentences, mots en vain, metaphores mal faites, Toute la rhetorique en fuite des peches, Ah, les Voix, mourez done, mourantes que vous etes! . . . . Mourez parmi la voix terrible de l'Amour! . . ...
— Suspended Judgments - Essays on Books and Sensations • John Cowper Powys

... fait aimer celle qui y a mis son ame, une etude du coeur humain bien vraie et bien delicate. L'amour de Dieu deborde dans ses pages charmantes, dont la lecture rechauffe le coeur. Je crois qu'il a ete fort apprecie dans nos pays de langue francaise. Une personne dont toute la vie est un service de ceux qui souffrent me disait ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... the honor of being introduced to the old Marquis de B——. In days of yore he had signalized himself by some small feats of chivalry in the Cour d'Amour, and had dressed himself out to the idea of tilts and tournaments ever since. The Marquis de B—— wished to have it thought the affair was somewhere else than in his brain. "He could like to take a trip to England," and asked much ...
— The Lock and Key Library • Julian Hawthorne, Ed.

... current; so that of course he must be embayed, and run chuck upon a lee-shore. He resolved, therefore, to lay the state of the case before Gamaliel Pickle, and concert such measures with him as should be thought likeliest to detach his son from the pursuit of an idle amour, which could not fail of interfering in a dangerous manner with the plan ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... Across the years? You used to sing it With laughter and tears. If you sang it now, dear, That kind old refrain, It would bring back the fragrance Of the dead years again. Le printemps pour l'amour — How did it go? Only we know; Sing it, sweetheart, to-night, ...
— An Anthology of Australian Verse • Bertram Stevens

... back that it might stay open, and she gave her finger tips a final rub with her handkerchief before she looked at the page. She paused a bit after she glanced at it, then picked up the book and read: "'L'homme est par Nature porte a l'inconstance dans l'amour, la femme a la fidelite. L'amour de l'homme baisse d'une facon sensible a partir de l'instant ou il a obtenu satisfaction: il semble que toute autre femme ait plus d'attrait ...
— Told in a French Garden - August, 1914 • Mildred Aldrich

... fit on l'amour, si son pouvoir n'affronte, Et la vie et la mort, et la haine et la honte! Je ne demande, je ne veux pas savoir Si rien a de ton coeur terni le pur miroir: Je t'aime! tu le sais! Que l'importe ...
— The Home • Fredrika Bremer

... Shift (No. 24. p. 383).—"The Duchess of Bolton (natural daughter of the Duke of Monmouth) used to divert George I. by affecting to make blunders. Once when she had been at the play of Love's last Shift, she called it 'La derniere chemise de l'amour.'"—Walpoliana, xxx. ...
— Notes & Queries No. 29, Saturday, May 18, 1850 • Various

... that Frank's pure spirit shuddered within him. "And I'll tell you this; whenever I see a woman nursing her baby, or a father with his child upon his knees, I say to myself—they know more, at this minute, of human nature, as of the great law of 'C'est l'amour, l'amour, l'amour, which makes the world go round,' than I am likely to do for many a day. I'll tell you what, sir! These simple natural ties, which are common to us and the dumb animals,—as I live, sir, they are the divinest things I see in the world! I have but one, and ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume I • Charles Kingsley

... lit. J'y regardais une place cherie, Tiede encor d'un baiser brulant; Et je songeais comme la femme oublie, Et je sentais un lambeau de ma vie, Qui se dechirait lentement. Je rassemblais des lettres de la veille, Des cheveux, des debris d'amour. Tout ce passe me criait a l'oreille Ses eternels serments d'un jour. Je contemplais ces reliques sacrees, Qui me faisaient trembler la main: Larmes du coeur par le coeur devorees, Et que les yeux qui les avaient pleurees Ne ...
— Robert Browning • C. H. Herford

... never heard before of the amour between the Duke de Nemours and the Queen-Dauphin; she was so much surprised at what her mother had told her, and seemed to see so plainly how she had been mistaken in her thoughts about the Duke, that she changed countenance. ...
— The Princess of Cleves • Madame de La Fayette

... Government to this want of means of sending intelligence of passing ships and ships in distress. In winter this strait is closed by ice, and the lighthouses are closed too. Inside the fine inlet of "Amour Bay," a natural dock, safe and extensive, we saw the masts of a French man-of- war. The French always protect their fishermen; we at home usually let them take care of themselves. This French ship had been in these English waters some time; and on a recent ...
— Canada and the States • Edward William Watkin

... founded in the thirteenth century, is situated near the Minnewater, or Lac d'Amour, which every visitor is taken to see. This sheet of placid water, bordered by trees, which was a harbour in the busy times, is one of the prettiest bits of Bruges; and they say that if you go there at midnight, and stand upon the bridge ...
— Bruges and West Flanders • George W. T. Omond

... received some civilities in this place, and, among the rest, the reputation of having for my lover the king of P—'s minister, who was young and airy, and visited me often; circumstances that were sufficient to lay me under the imputation of an amour, which I frequently incurred without having given the ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... the Brave succeeded him. At the court of the latter was a beautiful maiden, Inez de Castro, whom Alfonso's son Don Pedro had married secretly. The courtiers, fearful lest Pedro should show favor to the Castilians because Inez was the daughter of a Castilian, told the king of his son's amour. In the absence of Pedro, Inez was led before the king, bringing with her her children, to help her to plead for mercy. But the king was merciless, his counsellors, brutal, and at his signal they stabbed her. Pedro never recovered from the shock ...
— National Epics • Kate Milner Rabb

... first and the last time," he said hoarsely, and then he kissed her furiously, passionately,—twice, thrice, and once again. "C'est comme ca, l'amour!" he whispered; "and because you know nothing of it, you let ...
— A Woman's Will • Anne Warner

... comes to London, where he lives among the artists. He is bowed down with melancholy thought; he carries the whole weight of the universe upon his shoulders. He writes a novel of dazzling brilliance; he dabbles delicately in Amour and disappears, at the end of the ...
— Crome Yellow • Aldous Huxley

... love, only this time it would be a better life, a deeper, purer love. Yet immediately afterwards she recollected that this was impossible, for she had been soiled and degraded by an ignoble, senseless amour. ...
— Sanine • Michael Artzibashef

... man—was commandant of the battalion, and was stern in the exaction of discipline. During the stay of the Navarrese at Vera, a captain was degraded to the ranks for having entered the lists of illicit love. The Frenchwoman who was the partner of his amour was politely shown over the mountain and ...
— Romantic Spain - A Record of Personal Experiences (Vol. II) • John Augustus O'Shea

... Grain d'orge," in a fine big voice, and Carette sang "Nico v'nait m' faire l'amour," in a very sweet one, and I was sorely troubled that I had ...
— Carette of Sark • John Oxenham

... wife, who shrinks with horror at the thought of a vulgar amour, or of any act which could pain or anger her husband, has been led into the Devil's net by indulging in retrospective dreams of a vanished romance and through the stirring of old ashes to see ...
— The Devil - A Tragedy of the Heart and Conscience • Joseph O'Brien

... strong passions of her savage dupe in the way best calculated to gratify that undying spirit of vengeance which she had so long nurtured against the family of Lamh Laudher. The Dead Boxer, too, was determined to prosecute his amour with Ellen Neil, not more to gratify his lawless affection for her than his twofold ...
— The Dead Boxer - The Works of William Carleton, Volume Two • William Carleton

... attitude of the Southern states swept all radicals and most moderate Republicans swiftly into a merciless course of reconstruction. Moderate reconstruction had nowhere strong support. Congress, touched in its amour propre by presidential disregard, was eager for extremes. Johnson, who regarded himself as defending the Constitution against radical assaults, was stubborn, irascible, and undignified, and with his associates was no match in political strategy ...
— The Sequel of Appomattox - A Chronicle of the Reunion of the States, Volume 32 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Walter Lynwood Fleming

... l'amour...." The ward is changed! The eldest Sister and the youngest Sister are my enemies; the patients are my enemies—even Mr. Wicks, who lies on his back with his large head turned fixedly my way to see how often I stop at the bed whose number ...
— A Diary Without Dates • Enid Bagnold

... dans le sable Sous les grands pins d'un calme amer Surgit mon amour périssable, Faim de tes yeux, soif ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... French diplomat and wit, has given us the cleverest summing up of the ideal cup of coffee. He said it should be "Noir comme le diable, chaud comme l'enfer, pur comme un ange, doux comme l'amour." Or in English, "black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an ...
— All About Coffee • William H. Ukers

... Amour sacre de la patrie, Conduis, soutiens, nos bras vengeurs. Liberte, liberte cherie, Combats avec tes defenseurs. {267} Sous nos drapeaux que la victoire Accoure a tes males accens, Que tes enemis expirans Voient ton triomphe et notre gloire. Aux armes, ...
— The French Revolution - A Short History • R. M. Johnston

... of Cupids fly, fly, play and dance, here tying careless couples with roses, and tying above a circlet of kisses that has risen from earth to the sky. Here is the temple, here is the end of this world: the painter's L'Amour paisible, Love disarmed, seated in the shadows, which the poet of Theos wished to engrave upon a sweet cup of spring; a smiling Arcadia; a Decameron of sentiment; a tender meditation; attentions with vague glances; words that lull the soul; a platonic gallantry, a leisure occupied by the heart, ...
— Great Pictures, As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Esther Singleton

... least able of our English historians, however, would place these events in a different light. He insists, somewhat in the spirit of the monkish writers, on this amour being highly disgraceful to the king; and while he represents it as "the scandal of the age" (whose sources, in the king's disputes with the ecclesiastics, Mr. Lingard in any other instance would have ...
— Coronation Anecdotes • Giles Gossip

... Salter, of Hammersmith, states (11/28. 'Gardener's Chronicle' 1861 page 968.) that he has himself known this purple variety to produce the lilac, the rose-crimson or conspicuum, and the red or coccineum varieties; the latter has also produced the rose d'amour; so that altogether four varieties have originated by bud variation from Rollisson's Unique. Mr. Salter remarks that these four varieties "may now be considered as fixed, although they occasionally produce flowers of the original ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume I • Charles Darwin

... soins qu'il prend pour soutenir la gloire Soient gravs de ta main au livre o sont crits Les noms prdestins des rois que tu chris. Tu m'coutes. Ma voix ne t'est point trangre. Je suis la Pit, cette fille si chre, 20 Qui t'offre de ce roi les plus tendres soupirs. Du feu de ton amour j'allume ses desirs. Du zle qui pour toi l'enflamme et le dvore La chaleur se rpand du couchant l'aurore. Tu le vois tous les jours, devant toi prostern, 25 Humilier ce front de splendeur couronn, Et confondant l'orgueil par d'augustes exemples, Baiser avec respect le pav de tes temples. ...
— Esther • Jean Racine

... Reactionnaires Du Spectateur Conservateur Bras dessus bras dessous Font des tours A pas de loup. Dans un egout Une petite fille En guenilles Camarde Regarde Le directeur Du Spectateur Conservateur Et creve d'amour. ...
— Poems • T. S. [Thomas Stearns] Eliot

... demanded; enough that the face spoke eloquently, that the limbs were vigorous. Let beauty perish if it cannot ally itself with mind; be a woman what else she may, let her have brains and the power of using them! In that demand the maturity of his manhood expressed itself. For casual amour the odalisque could still prevail with him; but for the life of wedlock, the durable companionship of man and woman, intellect was ...
— The Odd Women • George Gissing

... untalkative whilst here, and often thoughtful: sometimes so lost in thought, that I have come into his room and stayed five minutes there before he has known anything of it. He had his masters generally at supper with him; kept very little company beside; and had no amour that I know of; and I think I should have known it, if he had had any."—ABBE ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Condorcet, then in the prime of his reputation, the correspondent of the king of Prussia, the intimate of Voltaire, the member of half the academies of Europe,—noble by birth, polished in manners, republican in opinions. There, too, was the venerable Malesherbes, "l'amour et les delices de la Nation." (The idol and delight of the nation (so-called by his historian, Gaillard).) There Jean Silvain Bailly, the accomplished scholar,—the aspiring politician. It was one of those petits soupers for which the capital of all social pleasures was ...
— Zanoni • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... should I mourn the loss of a love I never possessed? It was not as if they had waited till my supposed sudden death—no! within three months of my marriage they had fooled me; for three whole years they had indulged in their criminal amour, while I, blind dreamer, had suspected nothing. NOW I knew the extent of my injury; I was a man bitterly wronged, vilely duped. Justice, reason, and self-respect demanded that I should punish to the ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... struggled effectively in the moist, warm atmosphere somewhere in its concealment behind a distant palm arbor with "Un Peu d'Amour," and also out of Peter's sight, an impassioned ...
— Peter the Brazen - A Mystery Story of Modern China • George F. Worts

... that she could not understand how the utterance of some new fact, or the redressing and presentation of some forgotten idea, could possibly be regarded as an insult by the person thus benefited. Her first book taught her what was termed her "surplus paraded erudition," had wounded the amour propre of the public; but she was conscientiously experimenting on public taste, and though some of her indolent, luxurious readers, who wished even their thinking done by proxy, shuddered at the "spring-water pumped upon their ...
— St. Elmo • Augusta J. Evans

... he spoke neither his look, tone, nor manner displeased me; my AMOUR-PROPRE was propitiated; he had not addressed me out of condescension, but because, having repaired to the cool dining-room for refreshment, he now wanted some one to talk to, by way of temporary amusement. ...
— The Professor • (AKA Charlotte Bronte) Currer Bell

... Francis Parkman: The Jesuits in North America, p. 175. "O amour, quand vous embrasserai-je? N'avez vous point pitie de moi dans le tourment que je souffre? Helas! mon amour, ma beaute, ma vie! au lieu de me guerir, vous vous plaisez a mes maux. Venez donc que je vous embrasse et je meure entre vos bras sacres." Journal ...
— Religion and Lust - or, The Psychical Correlation of Religious Emotion and Sexual Desire • James Weir

... account book of their laundresses is the most faithful historic record as well as the most impartial account of their various amours. And really a prodigious quantity of tippets, cravats, dresses, which are absolutely necessary to coquetry, is consumed in the course of an amour. A wonderful prestige is gained by white stockings, the lustre of a collar, or a shirt-waist, the artistically arranged folds of a man's shirt, or the taste of his necktie or his collar. This will explain the passages in which I said of the honest woman [Meditation ...
— Analytical Studies • Honore de Balzac

... mythology Puck, or Hobgoblin, was the trusty servant of Oberon, and always employed to watch or detect the intrigues of Queen Mab, called by Shakespeare Titania. For in Drayton's Nynphidia, the same fairies are engaged in the sane business. Mab has an amour with Pigwiggen; Oberon being jealous, sends Hobgoblin to catch them, and one of Mab's nymphs opposes him by ...
— Johnson's Notes to Shakespeare Vol. I Comedies • Samuel Johnson

... which, with little chairs and tables, people sat on a space enclosed by plants in tubs; and the impression was enriched by the flash of the white aprons of waiters and the music of a man and a woman who, from beyond the precinct, sent up the strum of a guitar and the drawl of a song about "amour." Maisie knew what "amour" meant too, and wondered if Mrs. Wix did: Mrs. Wix remained within, as still as a mouse and perhaps not reached by the performance. After a while, but not till the musicians had ceased and begun to circulate with ...
— What Maisie Knew • Henry James

... dispatched messengers vnto the archbishop to vnderstand the cause as it were of that great assemblie, [Sidenote: The archbishops protestation why he had on him armes.] and for what cause (contrarie to the kings peace) they came so in amour. The archbishop answered, that he tooke nothing in hand against the kings peace, but that whatsoeuer he did, tended rather to aduance the peace and quiet of the common-wealth, than otherwise; and where he and his companie were ...
— Chronicles (3 of 6): Historie of England (1 of 9) - Henrie IV • Raphael Holinshed

... famous Virgin Actress,' (Mrs. Bracegirdle), in which the Diana of the stage is crudely rallied. 'The Virgin's Answer to Mrs. Behn' contains allusions to Aphra's intrigue with some well-known dramatic writer, perhaps Ravenscroft, and speaks of many an other amour beside. But then for a groat Brown would have proved Barbara Villiers a virgin, and taxed Torquemada with unorthodoxy. Brown has yet another gird at Mrs. Behn in his The Late Converts Exposed, or the Reason ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. I (of 6) • Aphra Behn

... in "Greek roots," for one's automatic hand to pass or receive the letter beneath the desks through the dangerous space of daylight between the two. "Let not your right hand know what your left hand doeth," Eileen once quoted when Marcelle's conscience pricked. For Marcelle imagined an amour of the darkest dye, and could not understand Eileen's calmness any more than Eileen could understand Marcelle's romantic palpitations alternating with ...
— The Grey Wig: Stories and Novelettes • Israel Zangwill

... lady by way of reducing herself, to an equality with the doctor, replied, "that she had no more money than himself; and that, though she had not a relation hanged, she had fifty who deserved hanging." And thus was accomplished this very curious amour. ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 13, - Issue 372, Saturday, May 30, 1829 • Various

... impression—might better register the thrill. But then it might not be just the same. I would be keyed to such expectancy that I might be disappointed. Persons in the seats behind me might whisper. And just as Chenal got to the "Amour sacre de la patrie" some one might cough. I am confident that something of the sort would surely happen. I want always to remember that ten minutes while Chenal was on the stage just as I remember it now. So I will not ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 2, No. 1, April, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... pernicious consequences thereof upon our humours and dispositions, hath been owing, among other causes, to the custom arisen, for some time past, of excluding women from any share in our society, further than in parties at play, or dancing, or in the pursuit of an amour. I take the highest period of politeness in England (and it is of the same date in France) to have been the peaceable part of King Charles I.'s reign; and from what we read of those times, as well as from the accounts I have formerly met with from some who ...
— The Battle of the Books - and Other Short Pieces • Jonathan Swift

... cavalier style of advance; but Easterns under such circumstances go straight to the point, hating to filer the parfait amour. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... vous a trahi, ce n'est pas la trahison qui importe; c'est le pardon qu'elle a fait naitre dans votre ame. . . . Mais si la trahison n'a pas accru la simplicite, la confiance plus haute, l'etendue de l'amour, on vous aura trahi bien inutilement, et vous pouvez vous dire ...
— Red Pottage • Mary Cholmondeley

... seems to touch; like Prometheus in the myth when he stole the fire, a shower of flowers and flames falls around him. Groueleau, of Paris, had for motto Nul ne s'y frotte, with the thistle for badge. These are beautifully combined in the title-page of his version of Apuleius, 'L'Amour de Cupido et de Psyche' (Paris, 1557). There is probably no better date for frontispieces, both for ingenuity of device and for elegance of arrangement of title, than the years between 1530 and 1560. By 1562, when the first edition of the famous Fifth ...
— Books and Bookmen • Andrew Lang

... house, as I had intimated to his Highness that I intended, not thinking it good enough to receive his visits in; but he said my house was the most convenient that could possibly be found in all Paris for an amour, especially for him, having a way out into three streets, and not overlooked by any neighbours, so that he could pass and repass without observation; for one of the back-ways opened into a narrow dark alley, which alley was a thoroughfare or passage out of one street into another; and any person ...
— The Fortunate Mistress (Parts 1 and 2) • Daniel Defoe

... penetrating my thoughts, she satisfied my curiosity without committing herself to a reply in words. Her large gray eyes sparkled as they rested on my face, and she hummed the tune of the old French song, "C'est l'amour, l'amour, l'amour!" There is no disguising it—something in this disclosure made me excessively angry. Was I angry with Miss Melbury? or with Mr. Sax? or with myself? I think it must have ...
— Little Novels • Wilkie Collins

... sweethearts both, though we find it noted as worthy of mention in the epitaph of the composer and canon, Pierre de la Rue, in the 16th century, that as an "adorateur diligent du Tres-Haut, ministre du Christ, il sut garder la chastete et se preserver du contact de l'amour sensuel." But because you see it in an epitaph, it is not ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 1 • Rupert Hughes

... innocente et coupable, et enfin plus estrange exposee an danger d'estre brulee toute vive. De plus quelle mourra plus contente qu'elle n'aura vescu, et que parmy les debris d'un Throne et le bouleversement d'un Royaume, son amour et son innocence la consoleront elle mesme de la perte d'une courrone que la ...
— Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36 • Sir John Lauder

... glorious exploit; these, on the contrary, glory in never having shed the blood of one, although they often imbrue their hands in the blood of their kindred; being very apt to quarrel among themselves, chiefly on account of their gallantry. When an illicit amour is detected, the consequence is frequently fatal to one of the parties; but the unmarried youth, of both sexes, are generally ...
— Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory • John M'lean

... en un jour, Tous les objets de mon amour? Nos claires ruisseaux, Nos couteaux [sic], Nos hameaux, Nos montagnes, Et l'ornament de nos campagnes, La si gentille Isabeau? A l'ombre d'un ormeau, Quand ...
— Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810 • Edward Ziegler Davis

... and which sets forth that this island was thrown up by a special act of providence as a place of refuge for a poor priest, a good and holy man, who, being admitted to the confidence of the court of a Chief then ruling over Kalorama, was discovered, by a keen-sighted attendant, in an amour with one of his daughters, a girl of so much beauty that various chiefs had come from the east, and the west, and the north, and the south, to lay their offerings at her feet. But to none of them would ...
— The Life and Adventures of Maj. Roger Sherman Potter • "Pheleg Van Trusedale"

... South-Sea House; what "fine fretwork he makes of their double and single entries!" With what a firm yet subtle pencil he has embodied "Mrs. Battle's Opinions on Whist!" How notably he embalms a battered beau; how delightfully an amour, that was cold forty years ago, revives in his pages! With what well-disguised humour he introduces us to his relations, and how freely he serves up his friends! Certainly, some of his portraits are fixtures, and will do to ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb (Vol. 6) - Letters 1821-1842 • Charles and Mary Lamb

... daughter Beauty, old L'Amour and Dudley Ruthyn, now enter upon the scene, each a fresh shadow to deepen its already sombre hue, while the gloom gathers in spite of the glimpse of sunshine shot through it by the visit to Elverston. Dudley's brutal encounter with Captain Oakley, ...
— The Purcell Papers - Volume I. (of III.) • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... feront admire de chac 1 Il avait des Rivaux, mais il triompha 2 Les Batailles qu' il gagna sont au nombre de 3 Pour Louis son grand coeur se serait mis en 4 En amour, c'etait peu pour lui d'aller a 5 Nous l'aurions s'il n'eut fait que le berger Tir[3] 6 Pour avoir trop souvent passe douze, "Hic-ja" 7 Il a cesse de vivre en Decembre 8 Strasbourg contient son corps dans un Tombeau tout 9 Pour tant de "Te Deum" pas un "De profun"[4] 10 — He died ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 14, No. 395, Saturday, October 24, 1829. • Various

... guilty of enticing away from me the crown prince, and making the future ruler of my country an obscurer, a necromancer, and at the same time a libertine! I was obliged to overlook his youthful preference for Wilhelmine Enke, and wink at this amour, for I know that crown prince is human, and his affections are to be consulted. If he cannot love the wife which diplomacy chooses for him, then he must be permitted the chosen one of his heart to console him for the forced marriage. At the same time this person was passable, and without the ...
— Old Fritz and the New Era • Louise Muhlbach

... respondi au dit Count ... [q] bientot apres la venue son dit uncle de Guyene quant il vient d'Espaign darrein en Engleterre [q] mesme [n]re S[r] le Roi prist le Coler du cool mesme son uncle et mist a son cool demesne et dist q'il vorroit porter et user en signe de bon amour d'entier coer entre eux auxi come il fait les ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 211, November 12, 1853 • Various

... formulation of his didacticism complicated considerably the free exercise of his expression. At the last, as is perhaps natural, he reverted to precedent and formulary, and in his "Hebe and the Eagle of Jupiter" and his "L'Amour Dominateur du Monde," is more at variance than anywhere else with his native instinct, which was, to cite the admirable phrase of M. de Fourcaud, exterioriser nos idees et nos ames. But throughout his life he halted a little between two opinions—the current admiration of the classic, ...
— French Art - Classic and Contemporary Painting and Sculpture • W. C. Brownell

... with the opening of the first exhibition of the Grosvenor Gallery, when the "Days of Creation," the "Beguiling of Merlin," and the "Mirror of Venus" were all shown. Burne-Jones followed up the signal success of these pictures with "Laus Veneris," the "Chant d'Amour," "Pan and Psyche," and other works, exhibited in 1878. Most of these pictures are painted in gay and brilliant colours. A change is noticeable next year, 1879, in the "Annunciation" and in the four pictures called "Pygmalion and the Image"; the ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... the youth received his earliest impressions of the grandeurs of nature. Shortly before the outbreak of the French Revolution he was sent to Paris, where he received a commission in the royal army. It was then he published his first poem, "L'Amour de la Campagne," in the Almanach des Muses. Dissatisfied with the revolutionary turn of affairs, he resigned his commission in 1790, and journeyed to North America. There he travelled extensively, seeking poetic inspiration from the wilderness and the primitive ...
— A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year - Volume Two (of Three) • Edwin Emerson

... have done, you can have escaped seeing her. She is too beautiful to remain unknown to you—particularly if her husband is, as they tell me, in your service. I asked her to give me his name, but she refused it point-blank. I do not wish to accuse you of an amour, which you are perhaps quite innocent of—but certain things taken in their conjunction look suspicious,—and I would remind you that honour in princes,—as in all ...
— Temporal Power • Marie Corelli

... An amour was with him a matter of amusement, a regular consequence, as it seemed to him, of the ordinary course of things in society. He was not at the trouble to practise seductive arts, because he had seldom found occasion to make use of them; his high rank, and the ...
— Woodstock; or, The Cavalier • Sir Walter Scott

... knew the reason now, and glowed with a fiery lust of battle. Vere had attracted him from the first. But this opposition drove on attraction into something stronger, more determined. He said to himself that he was madly in love. Never yet had he been worsted in an amour by any man. The blood surged to his head at the mere thought of being conquered in the only battle of life worth fighting—the battle for a woman, and by a man of more than twice his age, a man who ought long ago to have been married ...
— A Spirit in Prison • Robert Hichens

... married men. Those of them that one finds in clubs answer to a general description: they have wives too unattractive to entertain them, and yet too watchful to allow them to seek entertainment elsewhere. The bachelors, in the main, belong to two classes: (a) those who have been unfortunate in amour, and are still too sore to show any new enterprise, and (b) those so lacking in charm that no woman will pay any attention to them. Is it any wonder that the men one thus encounters in clubs are stupid and ...
— Damn! - A Book of Calumny • Henry Louis Mencken

... It is dat wheeskey dat's keel mon baby. Ah! mon cheri, mon amour. Ah! mon Dieu! Ah, Michael, how often I say that wheeskey ...
— Black Rock • Ralph Connor

... you are such a jealous coxcomb: I warrant you suspect there's some amour between 'em; there can be nothing in't, it is so ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. II • Edited by Walter Scott

... his own. But three months ago a daughter was born to the nuptials of Nevers, and that is why we are here to-night. Monsieur Peyrolles would pretend that it is the old marquis who is using us, the old marquis who is suspicious of an amour between his daughter and Nevers. ...
— The Duke's Motto - A Melodrama • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... happy you are to have a son so distinguished by his talents, by the variety and solidity of his acquirements, and, withal, as modest as if he knew nothing,—in these days, too, when youth is generally characterized by a cold and scornful amour-propre. One might well despair of the world if a person like your son, with information so substantial and manners so sweet and prepossessing, should fail to make his way. I approve highly the Neuchatel plan, and hope, in case of need, to contribute to its ...
— Louis Agassiz: His Life and Correspondence • Louis Agassiz

... Braybrooke. You are kindness itself. So, then, Beryl is going to marry! And she never hinted it to me, although we talked over marriage only yesterday, when I gave her Bourget's views on it as expressed in his 'Physiologie de l'amour moderne.' She never said one word. ...
— December Love • Robert Hichens

... of proof. Again, Eusebius argues, the interpreters take for granted in the makers of the myths an amount of physical knowledge which they certainly did not possess. For example, if Leto were only another name for Hera, the character of Zeus would be cleared as far as his amour with Leto is concerned. Now, the ancient believers in the "physical phenomena theory" of myths made out that Hera, the wife of Zeus, was really the same person under another name as Leto, his mistress. "For Hera is the earth" (they said at other times that Hera was the air), "and Leto is ...
— Myth, Ritual, and Religion, Vol. 1 • Andrew Lang

... friends with the wine at night Vive la compagnie! Two good friends when the sun grows bright Vive la compagnie! Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour! Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour! Three good friends, two good friends Vive ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... even in those higher reaches where it is mellowed by aesthetic sensibility, is well revealed by the fact that women are seldom bemused by mere beauty in men. Save on the stage, the handsome fellow has no appreciable advantage in amour over his more Gothic brother. In real life, indeed, he is viewed with the utmost suspicion by all women save the most stupid. In him the vanity native to his sex is seen to mount to a degree that is positively intolerable. It not ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... habituated to and spoilt by happiness. I growl like a true grumbler, at a walk being put off for a few hours! I do this! I who, during eighteen years, have only hoped to see you once more, without daring to reckon very much upon it! Oh! I am but a silly old fool! Vive l'amour et cogni—I mean—my Agricola!" And, to console himself, the old soldier gayly slapped ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... wakes from his after-dinner nap he begins to feel the stings of conscience. He is ashamed to face his wife, his son, Anfissa Ivanovna, and even feels very wretched when he recalls the scene at dinner, but his amour-propre is too much for him; he has not the manliness to be frank, and he goes ...
— The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... una fes perira, Fors que l'amour de Dieu, que tousiours durara. Tous nostres cors vendran essuchs, coma fa l'eska, Lous Aubres leyssaran lour verdour tendra e fresca, Lous Auselets del bosc perdran lour kant subtyeu, E non s'auzira plus lou Rossignol gentyeu. Lous ...
— Poems • William Cullen Bryant

... m'intrigue," said Katerina Alexeevna. "I must find it out. I suppose it is some affaire d'amour propre; il est ...
— Resurrection • Count Leo Tolstoy

... for the funeral with our Quartermaster, Captain Duguid. He was to be buried the next night at the Place D'Amour. ...
— The Red Watch - With the First Canadian Division in Flanders • J. A. Currie

... ground which might be used for the Canadian Cemetery. The Town Major gave us permission to mark off a plot in the new British cemetery. It was in an open field near the jail, known by the name of the Plain d'Amour, and by it was a branch canal. Our Headquarters ordered the Engineers to mark off the place, and that night we laid ...
— The Great War As I Saw It • Frederick George Scott

... others. Further, the allied emotion of self-esteem comes into play. To have succeeded in gaining such attachment from and sway over another is a proof of power which cannot fail to agreeably excite amour propre. Yet again, the proprietary feeling has its share in the general activity. There is the pleasure of possession, the two belonging to each other. Once more, the relation allows of an extended liberty of action. Toward each other a strained behavior ...
— The Four Epochs of Woman's Life • Anna M. Galbraith

... Gerard de Nerval, and they include: (1) Chants de la fete de Paques; (2) Paysans sous les tilleuls; (3) Concert des Sylphes; (4 and 5) Taverne d'Auerbach, with the two songs of the Rat and the Flea; (6) Chanson du roi de Thule; (7) Romance de Marguerite, "D'amour, l'ardente flamme," and Choeur de soldats; (8) Serenade de Mephistopheles—that is to say, the most celebrated and characteristic pages of the Damnation (see M. Prudhomme's essays ...
— Musicians of To-Day • Romain Rolland

... a barmaid. So much the worse for you, for by such conduct you have lost my esteem and my patronage. I have driven away the Swiss to humiliate you, but I shall lodge here no longer. I will not sleep where I must scorn. Ho, there, boy! Have my valise carried to the Muid d'Amour, ...
— Twenty Years After • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... COURAGEOUS, AND HONEST, AS YOU HAVE BEEN TILL NOW." For the rest, in the crisis that was approaching, she was not to be alarmed, but to trust in her "good natural sense and the TRUTH" of her character; she was to do nothing in a hurry; to hurt no one's amour-propre, and to continue her confidence in the Whig administration! Not content with letters, however, King Leopold determined that the Princess should not lack personal guidance, and sent over to her aid the trusted friend whom, twenty ...
— Queen Victoria • Lytton Strachey



Words linked to "Amour" :   sexual relationship



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